History and Story of Samrat Ashoka

In this article, we have published the History and Story of Samrat Ashoka. You will read Ashok’s early life, emperor life, and death.

So, let’s start the Story of Samrat Ashoka

Introduction (The Story of Samrat Ashoka)

Ashoka the Great (Ashoka the Emperor, Ashoka Maurya) succeeded to the throne of the Maurya Empire in 273 BC after the death of his father Bindusara. He is remembered for his efforts to spread the message of peace through Buddhism to the people.

King Ashoka is called Ashoka the Great. In his inscriptions, he is called Devanampiya (Darling of the Gods) and Piyadashi (Observer of the welfare of his people).

The most credible evidence of his rule is the images of Mauryan Emperor Ashoka, found in different parts of the country. Apart from these amendments, the Buddhist book Divyavadanam and the Ceylon Chronicles Mahavansa and Deepavansa also give important information about Asoka and his reign.

Early life

Ashoka was born in 304 BC and I am married to Emperor Bindusara. Ashoka has many siblings. He was a very intelligent and fearless child. He also received military training in his early life. When he was just 18 years old, Avanti was appointed viceroy. He is married to Vedisa-Mahadevi Shakya Kumari. Mahadevi gave birth to Mahendra (son) and Sangamitra (daughter).

Meanwhile, there was a big upheaval in Taxila and the situation was out of control. He summoned Ashoka and demonstrated his skills thereby successfully suppressing the rebellion.

As an emperor and success

Also read: The Story of Mahabharata in Short

After the death of Bindusara, the war of succession is mentioned. Ashoka emerged victoriously and won the throne with the help of Ramgupta (minister of the Bindusara court). 273 BCE although he succeeded to the throne, his coronation ceremony took place in 269 BC.

Ashoka followed the ideal of his predecessor and adopted a policy of expanding the Magadha Empire. In his eighth year, Ashoka conquered Kalinga after the bloody war. Ashoka invaded Kalinga, occupying a strategic position controlling land and sea route to South India.

In his Rock Revision XIII, Ashoka mentions the conquest of Kalinga and the great casualties. The rock slave wrote, “One million and fifty thousand were captured, one million died and this number has ended many times over.” The destructive nature of the Kalinga war gave Ashoka a psychological shock. He lamented that he was responsible for the suffering of fellow humans.

When he was in such a vampire mood, he met a Buddhist monk. Buddhist teachings touched his heart and he converted to Buddhism, which taught non-violence. After his conversion, he decided to serve all human beings. This change of Ashoka’s heart is reflected in his internal and foreign policies.

Of course, some states in the South of Ashoka have decided to abandon war policy to maintain their independence. Subsequently, he adopted a friendly approach to all the countries of the known world.

Kalinga was the only victory for Ashoka. But he inherited a vast empire from his ancestors. The discovery of the Ashoka sites and some more evidence may help us determine the boundaries of the Ashoka Empire. From this evidence, it seems that his kingdom encompassed vast tracts of land, from the Himalayas in the north to the Pennar (northern Mysore) in the south, from Hindukush in the northwest to the Brahmaputra in the east.

This includes Kabul, Kandahar, Herat and Nepal and Kashmir. Ashoka the Great (Ashoka the Emperor, Ashoka Maurya) succeeded to the throne of the Maurya Empire in 273 BC after the death of his father Bindusara. King Ashoka is called Ashoka the Great. In his inscriptions, he is called Devanampiya (Darling of the Gods) and Piyadashi (Observer of the welfare of his people).

The most credible evidence of his rule is the images of Mauryan Emperor Ashoka, found in different parts of the country. Apart from these revisions, the Buddhist texts Divyavadanam and the Ceylonese Chronicles Mahavansa and Deepavansa also give important information about Asoka and his reign.

Ashoka was born in 304 BC and I am married to Emperor Bindusara. Ashoka has many siblings. He was a very intelligent and fearless child. He also received military training in his early life. When he was just 18 years old, Avanti was appointed viceroy. He is married to Vedisa-Mahadevi Shakya Kumari. Mahadevi gave birth to Mahendra (son) and Sangamitra (daughter).

Meanwhile, there was a big upheaval in Taxila and the situation was out of control. He summoned Ashoka and demonstrated his skills thereby successfully suppressing the rebellion.

After the death of Bindusara, the war of succession is mentioned. Ashoka emerged victoriously and won the throne with the help of Ramgupta (minister of the Bindusara court). 273 BCE Although he succeeded to the throne, his coronation ceremony took place in 269 BC.

Ashoka followed the ideal of his predecessor and adopted a policy of expanding the Magadha Empire. In his eighth year, Ashoka conquered Kalinga after the bloody war. Ashoka invaded Kalinga, occupying a strategic position controlling land and sea route to South India.

In his Rock Revision XIII, Ashoka mentions the conquest of Kalinga and the great casualties. The rock slave wrote, “One million and fifty thousand were captured, one million died and this number has ended many times over.” The destructive nature of the Kalinga war gave Ashoka a psychological shock. He lamented that he was responsible for the suffering of fellow humans.

When he was in such a vampire mood, he met a Buddhist monk. Buddhist teachings touched his heart and he converted to Buddhism, which taught non-violence. After his conversion, he decided to serve all human beings. This change of Ashoka’s heart is reflected in his internal and foreign policies.

Of course, some states in the South of Ashoka have decided to abandon war policy to maintain their independence. Subsequently, he adopted a friendly approach to all the countries of the known world.

Kalinga was the only victory for Ashoka. But he inherited a vast empire from his ancestors. The discovery of the Ashoka sites and some more evidence may help us determine the boundaries of the Ashoka Empire. From this evidence, it is known that his empire encompassed a vast area from the Himalayas in the north to Pennar (northern Mysore) in the south, from Hindukush in the northwest to the Brahmaputra in the east. This includes Kabul, Kandahar, Herat and Nepal and Kashmir.

Death

Samrat Ashoka died in Pataliputra year 232 BC.

I hope you like this History and Story of Samrat Ashoka.

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